Rich Homie Quan Reveals How He Made Over $1M Last Year Without 'A Music Check Involved'
Photo Credit: Prince Williams

Rich Homie Quan Reveals How He Made Over $1M Last Year Without 'A Music Check Involved'

The era when Rich Homie Quan was a force in Hip-Hop is one to reminisce about.

Unfortunately, the Atlanta rapper’s takeover was unexpectedly cut short after he sued his former label, Think It’s A Game Entertainment, for allegedly swindling him out of $2 million, per TMZ.

The lawsuit is still ongoing, but it didn’t stop him from setting out on his own path. 

In addition to becoming the CEO of his own record label, Rich Homie Entertainment, Rich Homie Quan has recently seen success in real estate.

In an interview with Trapital’s Dan Runcie, he let people in on just how much he’s profited.

After watching the effects of being in the music industry firsthand, he grew a new level of understanding when it comes to the importance of longevity, which he aims to share with fellow rappers, especially the youth.

“I’m trying to put my peers and younger generation on real estate, man,” Rich Homie Quan told host Dan Runcie. “Less jewelry, less flashy — and get the things that really matter. We gon’ screen the block. Let’s go buy a couple of properties on the block. So, now we have a reason to rep the block.”

According to Rich Homie Quan, he’s seen great success by focusing on the lucrative industry. 

“I think last year I made a million plus on real estate,” he revealed. “And not a music check involved.”

The revenue came in from rental properties, several flips on houses, and selling his first home. What’s also notable is that all of the properties are in his home state of Georgia.

“I’m born and raised here, but now I’m getting on the level now I’m going out in different states and going to buy smaller stuff and just revamping them, reselling them — doing a clip flipping and stuff like that.” 

Real estate has been the move for Rich Homie Quan but he also ensured that he’ll be continuing to tap into his evolution of being a music CEO.

“Ten years from now, I’ll be 4,” he told Dan Runcie of Trapital. “I won’t be focusing on Quan the artist. But as far as Quan the CEO coin, [I] may start writing more because I just love music that much. And I still can’t see myself never not creating. So I’ve been even dipping into it now, writing more.”