Social Game Developer Zynga Donates $100K to Girls Who Code to Help Build the Next Generation of Women in STEAM
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Social Game Developer Zynga Donates $100K to Girls Who Code to Help Build the Next Generation of Women in STEAM

In honor of International Women’s Day 2021, Zynga is donating $100,000 to support Girls Who Code.

Founded in 2007, Zynga is the developer of social games. According to a press release, the $100,000 comes from the company’s $25 million Social Impact Fund, a fund Zynga launched last summer to invest in educational and charitable causes focused on diversity, equity and inclusion. Girls Who Code is a national nonprofit that supports young girls from third grade and beyond that are interested in pursing careers in technology, specifically in computer science. Nearly 50 percent of the girls that the nonprofit services are Black, Latinx or from low income communities.

Girls Who Code will use the $100,000 donation to expand its free clubs and alumni programs  and connect young girls to mentors with the support of the Women at Zynga group.

“Through their virtual workshops, school clubs, mentorship programs, networking and more, we are hoping to build the next generation of women in STEAM to help them to prepare and thrive in the tech workforce,” said Phuong Phillips, chief legal officer at Zynga, in a statement. “With an incredible group of women at Zynga already doing so much to support our studios and employees around the world, it’s important that we take positive steps to help strengthen the future of our industry for years to come.”

Photo Credit: Business Wire

Girls Who Code supports more than 80,000 college-aged alumni women working in computer science. The nonprofit reports that it’s on track to close the gender gap in computer science and related jobs by 2030.

“We’re excited to partner with Zynga this International Women’s Day to send a loud signal to young women everywhere that they belong in technology and that they have support in their journey from school into the workforce,” said Girls Who Code’s incoming CEO Tarika Barrett in a statement.