T-Pain Shares That Being A Twitch Streamer Has Paid Off More Than His Music In The Past Four Years
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T-Pain Shares That Being A Twitch Streamer Has Paid Off More Than His Music In The Past Four Years

When T-Pain’s career first took off in the 2000s, he became deemed as one of the greats in the music industry. Now, the musician has been getting more of a footing in gaming.

According to HipHopDX, T-Pain shared in an interview with Steve-O’s Wild Ride! podcast that in recent years his gaming career has brought in more money than music.

Success On Twitch

As previously reported by AfroTech, Twitch reached out to the seasoned veteran for a partnership due to his unique stream that combines gaming, music, and fan interaction. As of this writing, he is nearing one million with 846,000 followers.

What he has authentically brought to the platform is paying off — literally.

“I’m making more money off of video games than I have made in the last four years,” T-Pain said, according to HipHopDX. “Just playing them. Playing video games.”

Financial Troubles

Today, T-Pain still sells out shows and drops new music, but during the interview, he spoke his truth about once going broke.

“After I went through that whole episode I found out if I would have known that other artists have gone through this, people I look up to if they would have just said, ‘Look, it’s not all great. It’s not gonna be fine this whole time.’ If I woulda known that, I would have been mentally prepared, first of all, I would have prepared myself financially.”

He continued: “I would have put something aside, but, you know, from the people that came before me…’Nope, this whole thing is just money, all the time! You good at something? It’s money, always!’ Nobody has ever been like, ‘So this goes away after a while.’”

Struggles Of Being A Musician

T-Pain has been vocal in expressing the hardship that comes with the music business. Last year, he shared the reality of just how many streams it takes for artists to make $1 across various platforms, as previously shared by AfroTech.

“I see a lot of ‘well I guess I’ll use the best one’ and not ‘we gotta make our own’ keep in mind, most artists don’t even get the whole $1. I’m just letting the up and coming know what the real is. I worked for mine and there are tons of ways around this if you move right,” he wrote via Twitter.