Pharrell Williams Speaks On The Potential Power Of Web3: 'It’s Unlocking Something That Is Scaring The System'
Photo Credit: Richard Bord

Pharrell Williams Speaks On The Potential Power Of Web3: 'It’s Unlocking Something That Is Scaring The System'

Pharrell Williams is taking a look at the bigger picture with the growth of blockchain technology.

At VeeCon 2022 — the first-ever NFT-ticketed conference — the music mogul shared with attendees his belief that Web3 could possibly hold the power to create real global change, Decrypt reports.

Pharrell’s Perspective On The Space

Musicians like himself have experienced firsthand how blockchain and Web3 can expand their artistry. However, Pharrell thinks with its help, “decentralized communities and creators will be able to effect significant change in the world, pushing back against governments that seek to limit or strip away human rights,” according to the outlet.

“You come here talking to the people about the blockchain and Web3. What you should know is, this is a moment in time where everything is changing right now,” he said in his interview with entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk. “You all are looking at these old systems—you know that they’re antiquated, you know that they don’t work. And you are standing up, and you’re saying, ‘No more.’”

During the conversation, the VeeCon speaker went on further to describe his notion of how even the system itself is being affected by the technology. In Pharrell’s eyes, we’re witnessing a revolution in real-time.

“Blockchain and Web3—it’s unlocking something that is scaring the system,” he said. “They are working really hard to put laws together to try to legislate around your concept, your idea. You all are the most powerful human beings on this planet. You don’t know it yet.”

Music Industry Revolution

In talks of revolutions, Pharrell touched on the need for change for minorities in music, back in March, as previously reported by AfroTech.

“There’s not enough Black leadership. There’s not enough leadership from people of color,” he firmly stated. “There’s also not enough ownership — there just isn’t. As much as the music industry has given me, when you really love something or love someone you can be honest about the things that could be better. I gotta say that the ownership with people of color it’s just not been the same. And that’s something we’re working on now.”