Jimmy Iovine Says He Owes A Lot To Black Culture As He And Dr. Dre Take On The U.S. Public School System
Photo Credit: Kevin Winter
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Jimmy Iovine Says He Owes A Lot To Black Culture As He And Dr. Dre Take On The U.S. Public School System

Dr. Dre represented for South LA when he showcased the records that have shaped his legendary career this past Super Bowl Sunday and the proof showed in the numbers.

AfroTech previously reported that the Dr.Dre and Snoop Dogg-laced track, “Still D.R.E.” hit over a billion views on YouTube after their halftime performance. The record was released in 1999 and for more than two decades it’s re-appeared on the Billboard charts.

While sitting in the wins of still being a long-standing force in the industry, now, he’s helping the next generation break the mold with a new partnership.

The music mogul has teamed up with adidas and PENSOLE Design Academy to launch an innovative school program “that blends fashion, technology, and entrepreneurship,” according to Rolling Stone. Joining him to teach the young entrepreneurs is his longtime business and music partner Jimmy Iovine.

Students located in LA County will be offered a new curriculum spearheaded by the Iovine and Young Academy, the USC school founded by the duo in 2013.

The collaborative effort kicked off with “Wood U,” a series of workshops led by adidas and the Iovine and Young Academy, according to the outlet. Students worked with Inglewood rapper D Smoke to design their own sneakers and gear.

New Magnet School

Since 2013, Iovine and Dr. Dre have aimed to push past the traditional ways of education. With their upcoming magnet school, Regional High School #1, they’re continuing their dedication to having creativity taught to the youth early on, as previously reported by AfroTech.

The new high school is located in South LA — an intentional decision made by the two to provide opportunities to the Black and Latinx communities.

“I owe a lot to African American culture and the inner city, period,” Iovine said, according to Rolling Stone. “But a lot of these kids, you know, they have all these words for them: under-served, disadvantaged. But what they really have is superpowers.”

Regional High School #1 will open on Sept. 22.