After A Four-Year Battle, Dr. Dre And Xzibit Win Lawsuit Against Their Weed Brand Brass Knuckles
Photo Credit: Marcel Thomas

After A Four-Year Battle, Dr. Dre And Xzibit Win Lawsuit Against Their Weed Brand Brass Knuckles

After a four-year-long legal battle, Dr. Dre and Xzibit have come out as the winners.

The Lawsuit

Back in 2018, the rappers were sued for allegedly breaching a contract for their weed brand “Brass Knuckles,” TMZ exclusively reported in August of that year. Three plaintiffs claimed they were awarded a 14.5 stake, which was less than what was initially agreed on. Their attorney Larry Ecoff stated that greed was at the root of the lawsuit since it was alleged that Brass Knuckles was worth over $170 million instead of the initial estimate of $50 million. The three people were seeking monetary damages due to the money and work they put in.

Per the outlet, Dr. Dre’s lawyer, Howard King said that the lawsuit was “without any allegations of anything done by [Dre] that would justify naming him as a defendant,” and that doing so “is nothing more than a blatant and short-sighted attempt by the plaintiffs to generate publicity for their cause.”

The Defendants Dr. Dre And Xzibit Win

Now, Benzinga reports that the lawsuit is finally over as Dr. Dre and Xzibit were found not guilty. 

Via Instagram, attorney Darren M. Richie, Esq. further cleared the air.

“The truth shall always prevail! Took about 4 years but defended @xzibit, et AI in this case and sued their a** back too. Plaintiff took ZERO not one penny. We will never back down to BS. People can say whatever they want but be sure to stand up and fight back for what’s right! Case closed notice of settlement publicly filed!”

Following his attorney’s public post, Xzibit took a moment to share his appreciation. “Man!! @dre_esquire_ you are the f***** man. Thank you for rockin with us the whole way. #Victory #MovingOn.”

Additional Accusations

The outlet reports that Brass Knuckles was also previously accused of “lining their THC concentrate vape cartridges with a pesticide.” The allegations went on to be overturned by California’s high court.