Black-Owned Loyalty Bookstore Receives $20K From Wells Fargo To Fund Its Founder's Dream Of A Bookmobile
Photo Credit: M_a_y_a

Black-Owned Loyalty Bookstore Receives $20K From Wells Fargo To Fund Its Founder's Dream Of A Bookmobile

Loyalty Bookstore, founded by Hannah Oliver Depp, is a space where Black people, people of color, and queer people can build community through their shared love of diving into books.

While Good Morning America highlighted the Black and queer bookseller’s bookstore for Black Business Month, her mission is to champion Black and diverse voices each day it opens its doors. Located in Washington, D.C. and Silver Spring, MD, Loyal Bookstore shines a light on the plethora of stories being told while also catering to local residents.

 

Dream Of Books On Wheels For The District

Brainstorming a way to bring the power of books to the masses, Depp conjured up the idea of getting her own bookmobile.

“Turns out there’s tons of books that are fantasy and by Black people,” Depp told the outlet. “There’s horror. There’s mystery. There’s romance. So, I want to make sure that everyone knows that there’s a multiplicity of Black stories. We hope to build a bookmobile, so we can get out and see as many folks as possible.”

Loyalty Bookstore Receives A Big Check

Thanks to Wells Fargo, she is well on her way to having her dream come true.

During Depp’s interview with Good Morning America, the hosts shared the big news that the financial services company awarded Loyalty Bookstores with a $20,000 check to help her get books across the DMV.

Hannah Oliver Depp Shares Why She Founded The Bookstore

“I decided to open this bookstore because I wanted to have an influence not only on my community but also in publishing,” she said. “I wanted to provide jobs for people of color who love to sell books and talk about books. And people from all sorts of backgrounds to come together. Also, to represent my neighborhood so that they can see themselves on the shelves when they come in.”

She continued: “We wanted to influence what kind of books get published and what kind of books get attention. We were just desperate to show that we are a store that proves that people of color buy books. Black people buy books. And our community buys books. The name is that we wanted to let our community know that we were going to stay here.”